3 Simple Tips for Skill Improvement

Last year, my husband took my daughter outside to teach her how to perform a lay up. Over and over again, he instructed her how to layup with her right hand. When she finally got it, he repeated the same process to teach her how to lay up with her left hand. My daughter became frustrated during many of those practice sessions and wanted to give up, but my husband would talk to her to encourage her, and she’d get back out there and practice again. After many practice sessions he no longer had to tell her what to do, it became instinctive to her.

Our Pastor uses the same process to teach my daughter how to play a particular song on the keyboard. He teaches her the chords, she plays it, she comes home, forgets how to play it, goes back to practice with Pastor, where he has to teach her again. The more he trains her, the more she gets it. She can now play the entire song.

I thought about these example when I was inspired to write this post. I was thinking about all the times I, and many other people, gave up on something because it was too complex or because we didn’t want to practice. We gave up and never experienced the satisfaction my daughter experienced after finally learning how to perform a layup with the basketball or play a song on the keyboard.

If you want to improve at something, you have to practice:

Children work on their penmanship in elementary school to learn how to write.

Singers practice controlling their breathing and singing on key.

Bible study teachers study the Bible to prepare lessons for the class.

Chefs sharpen their skills to learn a new cooking technique.

Developers take classes to learn new software applications.

I’d love to interview Michael Jordan, Kobe Bryant, and LeBron James to find out how often they worked on layups, dunks, and free throws.

I wonder how often Beyoncé and Adele rehearsed a song before we actually hear it on the radio.

I’m sure countless hours are spent by Denzel Washington and Angelina Jolie to learn their lines for a movie.

All these people sacrificed their time practicing before attaining the level of success they’re now enjoying.

Yes, practice is required in every industry, but we need the tenacity to  keep at it. We can’t lose focus or interest. We can’t give up if we want to move from being a novice or mediocre to being an expert at our craft or in our industry.   And even after you’ve become an expert, never stop learning.

Here are a few simple tips to help you get more practice:

Set Aside Time

As stated above, regardless your industry, you must practice. Set aside time each week to hone your gift.  If you don’t set aside time to practice, it will show in your performance.  I encourage my daughter to practice the keyboard 30 minutes every day after school, even the songs she already knows how to play.  So, practice…and when you think you’re good enough, practice again!

Read, read, read

Seek out the experts in your field. You should know the website, Facebook page, or Twitter accounts of at least five experts in your field and read their content. If they’ve written books, buy them or check them out from your local library.  I read everything I can about blogging and writing.

YouTube

We are blessed to live in an age where instructional videos are everywhere.   YouTube is full of “how-to” videos.  I’ve watched YouTube to learn how to create the smoky eye look, how to fold fitted sheets (I hate folding fitted sheets), and how to obtain the perfect wash-n-go.

Don’t be content with being average or mediocre. Challenge yourself to excel in your field. We have the ability to be excellent at everything we do, but excellence demands that we perfect our gifts. Don’t stop now. With just a little more practice, you can become the go-to person for the next generation of learners.

Challenge:

What’s your gift or talent? Comment here explaining how you practice and how frequently you practice.

 

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